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betsybrey

Betsy Brey (BA and MA, University of Minnesota Duluth) is a PhD candidate specializing in game studies at the University of Waterloo department of English Language and Literature. Her research focuses on the narratological impacts of game mechanics. In particular, she researches mechanics and storytelling in metagames, virtual reality, and role-playing games. She works with the IMMERSe research network and The Games Institute, where her research has been funded with a Mitacs partnership. She is also the Editor-in-Chief for FirstPersonScholar.
betsybrey has written 5 posts for Rhetoric of the Digital Image

Let me take a #groupselfie: A Reflection on my #selfie practices

We’ve talked a lot about #selfies and the generalized genres we see in them, such as haircut selfies, weight loss selfies, or mirror selfies.  I came at this from a very confused standpoint. This was, of course, not because I don’t take selfies, but instead, I don’t participate in genres with a single selfie subject. … Continue reading

Summary: Primary Sources in Subjectivity

Multiple primary sources explore the portrayals of subjectivity in photography. For the purposes of this course, four primary sources were examined in depth. Each approaches subjectivity from a different angle. #iftheygunnedmedown is a tweet campaign which emerged following the 2014 fatal shooting of Michael Brown by police. When news of the killing first broke on … Continue reading

Everyday Digital Rhetoric: A Response

The term “digital storytelling” is often used to describe the mediation of personal stories online (Smith and Watson 71), which is particularly apt when it comes to the carefully curated versions of self seen in social media.  Any user of social media has, sometimes subtly and sometimes obviously, altered his or her self on social … Continue reading

Self(ie)-Control: Social Mediation of the Self–A Response

In 1997, Rugg notes that “it does sometimes occur that individuals make photographs of themselves” (3). The occasional occurrence of what is now referred to as a selfie was duly noted in this text: a minor counterargument briefly mentioned.  But in 2015, millions of photos are tagged as “selfies” on social media. We have moved … Continue reading

Autobiography as the struggle for control of self-image: Summary of Rugg’s “Introduction.”

Taking the stance that photographs are “weapons in an ideological struggle” (15), Rugg argues that photography, like autobiography, allows its subjects a kind of control over perceptions of selfhood both privately and publicly. We tend to understand photographs as a special kind of sign, believed to have a more realistic relationship towards between signified and … Continue reading

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